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socialismartnature:




This sculpture by Issac Cordal in Berlin is called “Politicians discussing global warming.”

socialismartnature:

This sculpture by Issac Cordal in Berlin is called “Politicians discussing global warming.”

(via capapendsdeath)

— 9 hours ago with 258541 notes

Ivughli, a secretary (munshi) at the Safavid court, compiled this collection of correspondence (majmu‘a-i munsh’at) sent by Persian rulers, from the Great Seljuks in the eleventh century to the Safavid shah Safi I (reigned 1629–42). In Iran, the art of letter writing was as much esteemed as eloquence and rhetoric. Penned in neat shikasta nasta‘liq (“brokennasta‘liq”), the text alternates between paragraphs written horizontally and diagonally from the right or the left.
One letter of particular interest is on the left-hand page. Composed by the Timurid ruler Sultan Husayn (reigned 1469–1506), it is addressed to the celebrated calligrapher Sultan Ali Mashhadi (died 1520). The sovereign reprimands the calligrapher for making too many mistakes when copying poems written in Turkish, the language Sultan Husayn used for his own poetry. (via)

Ivughli, a secretary (munshi) at the Safavid court, compiled this collection of correspondence (majmu‘a-i munsh’at) sent by Persian rulers, from the Great Seljuks in the eleventh century to the Safavid shah Safi I (reigned 1629–42). In Iran, the art of letter writing was as much esteemed as eloquence and rhetoric. Penned in neat shikasta nasta‘liq (“brokennasta‘liq”), the text alternates between paragraphs written horizontally and diagonally from the right or the left.

One letter of particular interest is on the left-hand page. Composed by the Timurid ruler Sultan Husayn (reigned 1469–1506), it is addressed to the celebrated calligrapher Sultan Ali Mashhadi (died 1520). The sovereign reprimands the calligrapher for making too many mistakes when copying poems written in Turkish, the language Sultan Husayn used for his own poetry. (via)

(Source: , via brsis)

— 9 hours ago with 53 notes
annabellioncourt:

There’s a lovely old English myth that if someone who truely loved and trusted the werewolf called it by name that it would turn back to human.
Others include throwing their human clothes at it and it’d turn back but that’s a bit less romantic

annabellioncourt:

There’s a lovely old English myth that if someone who truely loved and trusted the werewolf called it by name that it would turn back to human.

Others include throwing their human clothes at it and it’d turn back but that’s a bit less romantic

(Source: danielodowd, via schim)

— 1 day ago with 79217 notes
thebelltsar:

“Saccadic 1,” 2009. Oil on Canvas. Cara Thayer & Louie Van Patten.

thebelltsar:

“Saccadic 1,” 2009. Oil on Canvas. Cara Thayer & Louie Van Patten.

(via stellte)

— 3 days ago with 42458 notes

farorescourage:

busket:

sixpenceee:

alloursongswillbelullabies:

sixpenceee:

Doesn’t that look beautiful?

Like something you’d find on one of those soft/nature blogs?

Well you are in for a surprise

The Bolton Strid in England is one of the most innocent looking streams. 

Though it looks like you could just hop across the rocks, but if you miss you will die for sure. It packs very rapid currents just a couple of feet below its surface. No one really knows how deep it really is. Nobody who has ever fallen into the Strid has survived. It has a 100% fatality rate.

It’s always the things I google expecting to be false that wind up being horribly true.

I forgot to add but here is a SOURCE

"It’s relatively common for people to assume they can jump the creek, walk across its stones or even wade through it (again, just looking at it, the Strid really seems to be only knee-deep in places, and certainly not the instant, precipitous drop into a watery grave that it is). Most of the time, they never even find the body. Which means there are just dozens of corpses down there, pinned to the walls of the underground chasms, waiting for you to join them…"

how dare you leave out the best quote

It’s exactly how water works in a video game: It looks all stupid and harmless, but the second your foot touches the surface, you get some bullshit drowning animation and die instantly.”

(via crowquettish)

— 3 days ago with 86161 notes